Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Science Fiction, Science Future


- by Sylvia Ney

One of my favorite stops this summer was at the Reuben H. Fleet museum in San Diego, California. I took my daughters to the traveling exhibit "Science Fiction, Science Future".

We spent the day learning about what has led to our current understanding of science, what humans are currently working to develop, and being teased with challenges for the future. Gallery stops included:

- understanding what we know of sound and light
- move this object with your mind challenge
- become invisible
- design your own cyborg
- interact with robots
- and more than I can write about in one post!

Here are just a few of our explorations:

A section honoring the history of science fiction development - its authors, artists, and innovators. Rare books from the Department of Special Collections & University Archives (SCUA), artwork from comic book publisher IDW, and even displays from the Star Trek franchise were available for perusal - including a very special challenge (see pics below).











Created by the renowned Scitech Discovery Centre in Perth, Australia this exhibit is a visually compelling way to share a deeper understanding of how science fiction concepts of today are becoming a reality: including holograms.

Visitors are completely immersed in possibilities for medical technology, communication, and even transportation. This exhibit includes many innovations, inventions, and challenges -  a taste of anything a science lover could be looking for, especially when sharing the concepts with family and friends.

Thanks to this trip, my daughters truly enjoyed a glimpse at the possibilities for themselves and their future. I can't wait to see how they will contribute.

How will you contribute to our science fiction, science future? Will you or someone you know want to compete in the tricorder challenge listed in the above picture?

18 comments:

  1. I'd just want to be beamed!
    I hope that exhibit travels out east. I'd really like to see it.

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    1. I would love to go again, but I haven't been able to find a schedule of stops or locations for this exhibit. I'm not likely to make it back to California before it's gone.

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  2. Fascinating exhibit. I'd love to check out all of the old books.

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    1. It was an amazing exhibit! I could have spent all day looking just at the books. It made we want to come home and reach for some great scifi!

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  3. I love the idea of a tricorder, it'd be an amazing feat and a great addition to healthcare! Noninvasive and when they manage to make it a healing instrument too - perfection!

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    1. I know! Can you imagine? I could write a whole story just about that instrument!

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    1. It really was. I wish everyone had an opportunity to visit.

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  5. The exhibit sounds great. We are definitely finding the time to go, my kids will love it.
    How awesome that Qualcomm is helping push the medical field forward, I hope someone wins and creates the device.

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  6. I hope you do get a chance to check it out. If so, let us know what you thought!

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  7. Ooh, this sounds like a really intriguing exhibit. Thanks for sharing it with us!

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  8. Oh, wow! This looks like such a fun exhibit!

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  9. Sounds like it was a fascinating exhibit. And yes, I would love to be beamed up, too.

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  10. Oh wow, looks like a real nice place to visit! Have a good weekend, babe! xoxo

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  11. Engage! We've got the blueprints, so lets make all this stuff operational!

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  12. That would be a dangerous place to take my kids. They're already huge science geeks. =)

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  13. This looks like a lot of fun. It's fun to see how close some authors have come to predicting the future in their books and how the world differs from their visions as well. I'm thinking of Orwell's cameras in 1984 and how we actually have that today. But who knew how many of these cameras would be phones?

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