Friday, April 22, 2016

S = Sunrise

S is for Sunrise

Did you know that clean air is the main ingredient in brightly colored sunrises and sunsets? Or that ordinary sunlight is composed of a spectrum of colors that grade from violets and blues at one end to oranges and reds on the other. Did you know that if not for the fact that the human eye is more sensitive to blue light than to violet, the clear daytime sky would appear violet instead of blue.

I found this article most interesting. I hope you do too!

by Stephen F. Corfidi


Stephen F. Corfidi's article explains where the colors of a sunrise or sunset come from and in a way easy to understand. Please follow the link to read more.


A sunrise is something the inhabitants of Ever-Ton haven't seen in years.

Yolanda Renée © 2015



Yolanda Renée

Excerpt:

Homemade flowers, along with wiry trees, lined the broken cobbled streets. Ever-Ton, the biggest dome-covered metropolis in the Himalayas, had lost its luster. Workers used to keep it clean; now they worked on building the resources for the new world. The dome, once translucent, now looked like a mud-covered window. I'd never experienced the sun's rays, breathed air that wasn't manufactured or tasted water from a spring.
Donning sunglasses against the artificial sunlight, I hurried to NWAO headquarters to find a crowd waiting to take the tour of the latest and most modern spacecraft, named Sunrise.
***

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13 comments:

  1. Super interesting article - thanks for the share!

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    1. Hi, Sylvia, thank you. Sunsets and sunrises are so cool and to learn how they come about, amazing!

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  2. The science behind sunsets is definitely interesting. I've always been a bit of a science geek, though. Though I love blue, I wouldn't mind seeing a violet sky!

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    1. Hi, Laura, me too! You have to wonder what it would be like to look up and see violet everyday.

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  3. I once thought it would be fun to answer the question "Why is the sky blue?" for a science lesson for my daughter's preschool. It's not a simple answer at all!

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  4. Interesting facts about sunsets. Something I take for granted but which are now more interesting knowing a bit of the science behind it.

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    1. Hi, Ellen, totally cool. I bet your view from the ocean is even more amazing than from land.

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  5. That is interesting. I'm not sure why, but I thought pollution made better sunsets. Ever-ton, great story.

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    1. That's the popular view, I was surprised too!

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  6. Well, I liked the story, for it sets up a fascinating 'view' (forgive the pun) of what life under a dome might be like, especially given the government/ruler's changing priorities. I also liked that sense of wistfulness the narrator feels. Interesting!

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    1. Hi, Beth, thanks, I appreciate you comments. I hope you'll get a chance to read the entire story!

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  7. Fascinating article, and very interesting story excerpt!

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Your comments are most appreciated!